Mixmate® Polymer Feed – Application Notes

Mixmate®


Application Notes

We built and sold the MixMate® for a number of years on a one-size-fits-all basis, and had a great deal of success. That unit had a 1/4″ nozzle and a 1″ two-element mixer, what we would now call a M102-4XX (filling in the X’s with the number and range of the flowmeters). Eventually, however, we ran into enough different types of application to begin to experience some difficulties, usually with the unit plugging at the tip of the injector or in the mixer. The first was with a customer who turned out to be pumping an emulsion polymer with primary and secondary flows of 0.25 gpm. As a result, we began prototyping and building Mix Mates® that employed a smaller nozzle and a smaller static mixer. Those systems performed better than our one-size unit, so we tried to figure out why. That led to the formulas determining the component flow velocities and pressure drops, and to comparing systems that worked well against those that did not. Ultimately, our better understanding of how the MixMate® really worked led to our current expanded product line.
Like most people in life, our customers know a little or a lot about what they’re trying to do. Usually they know they’re trying to feed a polymer, and sometimes what kind or how much. Frequently, they’re the third party between a chemical salesman and us, trying to relay enough information to solve their own water treatment problem. Often our customer is the chemical salesman, who knows a lot about his polymer, but less about how to get his product into his customer’s water stream. All of this led to our development of the list of questions given in the MixMate® Selection Section. You’ll seldom get all the answers, but with a little experience you’ll find that the MixMate® is usually forgiving enough to let you select and sell equipment that will work, even with only a few of the answers. The following examples fall into the “real life” category, and show that you can extrapolate solutions for our customers even without all of the information. We are trying to build our mutual knowledge base about polymers, and specifically polymer feed equipment. If you have something to teach us, so that we can pass it along, please don’t hesitate to call us or leave a message at our Feedback key. Thanks

VII. Plating WWT — TroubleshootingThe customer mentioned above has a M102-422, is using 1 Lpd of non-ionic emulsion polymer, primary water is at 0.25 gpm, and secondary water is at 0.25 gpm. Plugging is occurring at the tip of the injector and at the mixer. What is the solution?Q1: 1 LPD (0.26 GPD)A: Going to the formulas on page two of the Specifications2: NANozzle FPS*=(0.25)2=0.413: Non-ionic emulsion2.45 X (0.25)24: 1 %Mixer FPS=(0.25)2=0.0315: 0.5 %2.45 X (0.9)26: NA 7: Open discharge

*FPS = Feet Per Second

In retrospect, we should have put a low flow limit on our one-size unit at 2.0 gpm. The recommended nozzle velocity is 10 – 40 FPS (here we have 0.41 FPS), and the recommended mixer velocity is 1–10 FPS (here we have 0.031 FPS). We offered a prototype M032-321 for trial, and got much improved results, without the plugging problem. We now sell the customer a M022-121, and they’re happy.

VIII. Mining WWT
Q1: 2.5 – 5.0 ppm A: The 700 gpm is right at 1 MGD, so 5 ppm is 5 gpd of neat polymer. With no psi information we have to be moderate in the psi drops we choose. Since most emulsions like to be made up at 1 %, and diluted to 0.5 %, we can guess at 500 gpd (0.35 gpm) each of primary and secondary water and thus 0.1 – 1.0 gpm flowmeters. We sold the customer a M022-122 MixMate®, along with a pump and some accessories.
2: 700 gpm maximum
3: Emulsion
4: NA
5: NA
6: NA
7: NA
IX. Sludge Dewatering
Q1: 0.1 – 0.5 % A: With 400 gph of sludge, 0.5 % polymer by volume is 2 gph of neat polymer. This relates to 200 gph each of primary and secondary water, or 3.3 gpm. We sold the customer a M072-424 (since we weren’t sure about the available water psi), along with a pump.
2: 80 – 400 gph
3: Anionic emulsion
4: 1 %
5: 0.5 %
6: NA
7: NA
X. Industrial WWT
Q1: 10 ppm A: This was a quote that never happened. At 8,000 gallons per batch, 10 ppm is 0.08 gallons of polymer. With 10 minutes to deliver, that’s 0.48 gph. At 1 % and 0.5 %, the application would call for 0.2–2.0 gpm flowmeters. We quoted a complete feed system including a M022-323.
2: 8,000 gal/batch/hour
10 minutes to deliver
3: Anionic emulsion
4: 1 %
5: 0.5 %
6: NA
7: NA

 

VIII. Mining WWT
Q1:    2.5 – 5.0 ppm A: The 700 gpm is right at 1 MGD, so 5 ppm is 5 gpd of neat polymer. With no psi information we have to be moderate in the psi drops we choose. Since most emulsions like to be made up at 1 %, and diluted to 0.5 %, we can guess at 500 gpd (0.35 gpm) each of primary and secondary water and thus 0.1 – 1.0 gpm flowmeters. We sold the customer a M022-122 MixMate®, along with a pump and some accessories.
2:      700 gpm maximum
3:      Emulsion
4:      NA
5:      NA
6:      NA
7:      NA
IX. Sludge Dewatering
Q1:   0.1 – 0.5 % A: With 400 gph of sludge, 0.5 % polymer by volume is 2 gph of neat polymer. This relates to 200 gph each of primary and secondary water, or 3.3 gpm. We sold the customer a M072-424 (since we weren’t sure about the available water psi), along with a pump.
2:     80 – 400 gph
3:     Anionic emulsion
4:     1 %
5:     0.5 %
6:     NA
7:     NA
X. Industrial WWT
Q1:  10 ppm A: This was a quote that never happened. At 8,000 gallons per batch, 10 ppm is 0.08 gallons of polymer. With 10 minutes to deliver, that’s 0.48 gph. At 1 % and 0.5 %, the application would call for 0.2–2.0 gpm flowmeters. We quoted a complete feed system including a M022-323.
2:    8,000 gal/batch/hour
      10 minutes to deliver
3:   Anionic emulsion
4:   1 %
5:   0.5 %
6:   NA
7:   NA